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Yankees’ Jose Trevino, Jon Berti combine for sneaky defensive gem

Jose Trevino hit a two-run homer to tie the game and hit what would have been his sixth home run of the year.

But the Yankees catcher didn’t need a bat for the most memorable and impressive play of the afternoon.

In Sunday’s 7-2 win over the White Sox in the Bronx, Trevino’s brains and arms produced an inning and a jam-ending pickoff.

Carlos Rodon was already in a pinch in the second inning, allowing two runs and trying to send Zach Remillard to third base with two outs.

On a two-strike count, Martin Maldonado successfully checked the swing, but just when most thought the play was over, it was just beginning.

Trevino caught Rodon’s pitch and appealed to first base umpire Trip Gibson, but other than Trevino and third baseman John Bartee, all eyes were on the first base side.

“I was looking at the check.[-swing] Give me a call,” Rodon said. “I think [Remillard] I was looking there too. ”

Berti turned his back on Trevino and snuck in behind Lemirard, who couldn’t see where the catcher was looking.

Trevino’s glove was facing first base, but he stood up, threw across his body and behind Remillard, who was casually approaching the bases.


Center fielder Jon Barty ran off the field after striking out Zach Remillard of the Chicago White Sox (1 RBI) midway through the second inning.
Center fielder Jon Barty ran off the field midway through the second inning after striking out Zach Remillard of the Chicago White Sox (1 RBI). AP

Berti hit the tag and ran off the field for an out, Trevino’s first successful back pick of the season, saving Rodon from danger.

“Him and Berti are really heads up there,” manager Aaron Boone said. “Pay attention to the small things.

“So many little things happened this year in different situations, and those little treasures of victories helped you along the way.”

Trevino praised Berti, saying he “did a good job,” but when asked for a follow-up on whether Berti signaled the play, Trevino flatly refused to reveal the Yankees’ secret publicly.


Pitcher Jose Trevino congratulates pitcher Clay Holmes during the bottom of the 9th inning of a game against the Chicago White Sox on Sunday, May 19, 2024 at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, New York.
Pitcher Jose Trevino congratulates pitcher Clay Holmes during the bottom of the 9th inning of a game against the Chicago White Sox on Sunday, May 19, 2024 at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, New York. Corey Shipkin of the New York Post

“Trevi is paying attention as always and so am I,” Barty said. “I’m trying to read the runner on third base and take advantage of the opportunity with two outs.”

Trevino, who is in his seventh year as a pro and is one of the best defensive catchers in baseball, said it was the first time in his career that he appealed to one side and threw the other.

The fact that he did it with Berti (an acquisition from the Marlins in a late March trade) is a great way to get to know his Yankees teammates in camp and see if they’re on the same page about plays like this. The fact that he was traded in late March from the Marlins, who had lamented that they didn’t have time to do anything about it, made it even more so. of difficulty.

Berti and Trevino, neighbors in the clubhouse, didn’t need spring training to come together for their smartest play of the season.

“Maybe I got that power by being rocker buddies,” Trevino joked. “We’re starting to connect that way.”

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