.elementor-panel-state-loading{ display: none; }
total-news-1024x279-1__1_-removebg-preview.png

LANGUAGE

SELECT LANGUAGE BELOW

Ticketmaster customers’ personal information possibly leaked to the dark web following cyberattack

TechCrunch report Ticketmaster, the ticketing division of Live Nation, said it had been hacked. The entertainment giant notified government regulators after the market closed on Friday, acknowledging the hack.

Live Nation said in a statement that the breach occurred on May 20. Whoever was behind the attack was reportedly “selling what they said was their user data via the dark web.” Live Nation has not said who this personal data belongs to, but it is believed to belong to its customers.

It remains unclear why it took the company so long to report its findings to the appropriate authorities.

“A single credential could have exposed data from hundreds of companies that used Snowflake to store their data, with the threat actors themselves suggesting that 400 companies were affected.”

Live Nation The statement said:“On May 20, 2024, Live Nation Entertainment, Inc. (the “Company” or “we”) identified unauthorized activity within a third-party cloud database environment that contained our data (primarily data from our subsidiary, Ticketmaster LLC) and initiated an investigation with industry-leading forensic investigators to understand what occurred.”

“On May 27, 2024, a criminal threat actor sold purportedly our user data via the dark web. We are working to mitigate the risk to our users and our company and have notified and cooperated with law enforcement.”

TechCrunch reached out to a Ticketmaster spokesperson who confirmed the stolen database was Hosted on Snowflake— a Boston-based cloud storage and analytics company. But the spokesperson did not disclose how the data was removed from Snowflake’s systems.

Saturday, Snowflake A statement was issued Snowflake wrote, “Snowflake has recently observed and is investigating an increase in cyber threat activity targeted at some of our customer accounts, which we believe is the result of an ongoing, identity-based attack across our industry aimed at obtaining customer data.”

“Our investigation has shown that these types of attacks are being carried out using user credentials of our customers that were exposed by an unrelated cyber threat campaign. To date, we do not believe this campaign was caused by a vulnerability, misconfiguration, or malicious activity within Snowflake products,” the statement concluded.

“To put it bluntly, a single credential could have exposed data from hundreds of companies that used Snowflake to store their data, with the threat actors themselves suggesting that 400 companies were affected,” cybersecurity firm Hudson Rock said.

“[T]The file, which the threat actors shared with Hudson Rock researchers, shows the depth of their access to Snowflake’s servers. The file records over 2,000 customer instances associated with Snowflake’s European servers.”

Administrators of the revived cybercrime forum BreachForums have noted that the personal information of 560 million customers is up for sale, including that of Ticketmaster customers.

It is unclear what other companies were affected by the attack.

Like Blaze News? Bypass the censorship and sign up for our newsletter to get stories like this one directly to your inbox. Register here!

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Reddit
Telegram
WhatsApp