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Why it’s the craziest NY sports social feed

Meet the Mets and their army of fearless digital fans, whose dedication to their team is truly remarkable, if not more so than it sometimes proves.

The “lovable loser” faithful are well aware of the rollercoaster of emotions that occurs every baseball season, and they take to social media in unique and sometimes bold ways.

“Mets Twitter is like being at a bar.” Gotham Baseball and Longtime Mets president Twitter (now X)“When the Mets are winning, it’s a lot of fun, but when they’re losing, it’s a Robots game,” he told the Post.

Some fans were so infuriated by their passion that they were blocked by Mets owner Steve Cohen with an X, a testament to the power of social media in the world of sports fandom.

“Steve Cohen blocked me. [X] “Because he says I’m too negative.” “Frank the Tank” Fleming“He said he wouldn’t take a photo with me because I have to be nicer to the players,” said the 48-year-old Barstool Sports blogger from Belleville, New Jersey, who is one of the most polarizing Mets fans on social media.

“Frank the Tank” Fleming is an outspoken Barstool Sports blogger and one of the most polarizing Mets fans on social media. Olga Ginsburg, New York Post
“Steve Cohen blocked me. [X] “He says I’m too negative,” said Fleming, photographed at Barstool Sports’ Gambling Cave, a popular spot for watching games and hanging out. “He said he didn’t want to take a picture with me because he needs to be nicer to his players.” Olga Ginsburg, New York Post

As his feud with the Mets manager continues, Fleming posted the video last week. Despite having harshly criticized Mets shortstop Francisco Lindor a month earlier, calling him “the most (highest paid) and (overrated) loser in baseball,” he asked for Lindor’s autograph.

After getting it, he wrote: “Cohen is punching the air right now.”

“Frank the Tank” works as a blogger and content creator, sitting at a Barstool desk covered in Mets kitsch and memorabilia. Olga Ginsburg, New York Post

Fans across the league consider the Mets to have one of the most passionate social media fanbases, and that enthusiasm will reach a fever pitch when the Subway Series against the Yankees begins Tuesday at Citi Field.

“The Mets and their fans are torn apart by fate. There’s always something to cry about, even if it’s a myth or a fabrication,” said the widely respectedMetstradamusI’ve been blogging since 2005.

John Coppinger, 53, of Rego Park, is the author of the widely respected blog “Metstradamus.” Stefano Giovannini

“We’re also seeing more fans commenting on things like there being rats or raccoons in the clubhouse, or Jorge Lopez throwing his glove into the stands and being released, or Grimace, Bernie Madoff and Tony Bernazard taking off their shirts and challenging minor leaguers to fights.”

When Grimace, a plump, purple McDonald’s character, threw the ceremonial pitch before the game against the Marlins on June 12, sparking an impressive seven-game winning streak, fan reactions became a hot topic online.

“The Mets and their fans are fatefully torn apart. There’s always something to cry about, even if it’s a myth or a fabrication,” Coppinger said. Stefano Giovannini

MetzgalThe Long Island X-user declined to give her real name, but wasn’t shy about telling the Mets’ Twitter where she’d like to get a tattoo of the team’s newest lucky charm. Tweets are trending.

“I thought it would be funny if I said I was going to get a Grimmus tattoo on my butt,” Metzgall said. “The team is doing well, and some of the Mets Twitter users are really responsive when the team is doing well and really down when they’re not doing well.”

It remains to be seen whether she will follow through on her promise, but Brett Engleman of Scranton, Pennsylvania, has already done so.

Engleman got a tattoo of the Mets’ grimace. Brett Engleman

The 26-year-old commemorated the birth of his first child, son Benjamin, by getting a tattoo of his new Mets idol from the land of the Golden Arches inked on his shin.

He is He shared a photo of his new tattoo. Engleman’s grimace was posted to his main Instagram Story feed. 7 Lineis a Mets-centric clothing and support group with 118,000 followers.

“I had a son, so Grimace’s run was something I’ll never forget, so I brought the idea to an artist and he painted it,” Engleman told the Post. “There aren’t a lot of Mets fans in my hometown, so I wanted something different.”

“I had a son, so Grimace’s run was something I’ll never forget, so I brought the idea to an artist and he painted it,” Engleman told the Post. “There aren’t a lot of Mets fans in my hometown, so I wanted something different.” Brett Engleman

In recent years, some Mets fans have moved away from bragging and exchanging witty quips within the 280-character limit of X. Instead, they express their opinions through songs that use musical jingles, some elaborate, some impromptu.

“I’m a goofy guy and a Mets fan.” Greg “Jingleman” PrincipleThe 41-year-old Middle Island, N.Y. resident said, “Mets social media is such a diverse place where everyone can find their way.”

Princivil, who works in digital advertising, posts jingles mainly during “RBI moments during the game.” In one clip, he remixes The chorus of Night Ranger’s song “Sister Christian”How much is the flight fare while traveling by car?“To”Al Varez, watch the ball take off” after Mets catcher Francisco Alvarez hit two home runs in a May 9 game against the Cincinnati Reds.

“I’m a goofy guy and a Mets fan,” said Greg “Jingleman” Princiville, 41, of Middle Island, New York.
Princivil, who works in digital advertising, mainly posts jingles during “RBI moments during the game.”

Drummer Jordan Simpson, also from Long Island and a jazz student at The New School, is an occasional collaborator with Princiville; in one video, the two jam to Michael Jackson’s “Man in the Mirror.” Principle sings the lyricsI want a guy named JD Martinez, he’s a power hitter with a great BA.. “

Simpson said it can take up to six hours to create the custom jingle videos that summarize each Mets series. When Grimas’ Mets winning streak was snapped against the Texas Rangers on June 19, Simpson donned a full-body McDonald’s costume and recorded a clever series summary video. The jingle will be set to Beyonce’s “Texas Hold ‘Em.”

“Mets social media is such a diverse place where everyone can find their way,” Princiville (left) and Jordan Simpson said. Greg Princiville

“I was there when Grimace threw the first pitch, so I wanted to do a song featuring him, but I didn’t have any purple in my wardrobe,” Simpson said. “I didn’t want it to be too low-key, so I bought the costume for $50, and it was well worth it.”

Many Mets fans say voicing their opinions on social media, along with the online notoriety, has helped them find their voice.

Rocco Bruzzese regularly talks about Mets baseball with patrons at his family’s two Long Island pizza places, Café Dolce Vita. Since launching in 2022, Bruzzese’s accounts have: Followhas grown his following to over 7,000 thanks in part to his consistent posts about the Mets.

Rocco Bruzzese regularly talks Mets baseball with regulars at Café Dolce Vita, two Long Island pizzerias his family owns. Stefano Giovannini
“Customers come in all the time and talk about the Mets,” Bruzes said, “and those conversations inspired me to start tweeting and podcasting about sports, and now my followers come in to eat our pizza.” Stefano Giovannini

“Customers come in all the time and talk about the Mets,” said Bruzes, 33, of Plainview. “Those conversations inspired me to start tweeting and podcasting about sports, and now my followers come in to eat our pizza.”

Hector Moquette, known as “Hector from Washington Heights,” regularly posts pot-smoking #BluntThoughts to Twitter in between Uber rides. Olga Ginsburg, New York Post
“Mets fans seem to be the loudest,” Moquette said. “For the most part, the team is in control of how we feel.” Olga Ginsburg, New York Post

Between Uber fares,Hector in Washington Heights” regularly posts about smoking marijuana. #HandsOnOpinion He’s active on Twitter and has been a phone-in commentator for WFAN since 1999.

“Mets fans seem to be the loudest,” said Mockett, 48. “For the most part, the team is in control of how we feel.”

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