.elementor-panel-state-loading{ display: none; }
total-news-1024x279-1__1_-removebg-preview.png

LANGUAGE

SELECT LANGUAGE BELOW

Ippei Mizuhara, ex-interpreter for baseball star Shohei Ohtani, pleads guilty in sports betting case

A former interpreter for Los Angeles Dodgers star Shohei Ohtani pleaded guilty Tuesday to bank fraud and tax evasion, admitting to stealing about $17 million from the Japanese baseball player to pay off sports betting debts.

Mizuhara Ippei’s crime shocked the baseball world and shattered his image as Ohtani’s shadow in stadiums across the United States.

He pleaded guilty Tuesday in federal court in Santa Ana, California.

Mizuhara Ippei pleaded guilty and admitted to stealing about $17 million from Japanese baseball players to pay off sports gambling debts.
Reuters

The former interpreter used his personal and professional relationship with Ohtani to embezzle millions of dollars from the two-way player’s accounts over the course of years, sometimes posing as Ohtani to bankers.

Mizuhara signed a plea agreement detailing the charges on May 5, and prosecutors made it public a few days later.

Mizuhara’s gambling winnings totaled more than $142 million, which he deposited into his own bank account rather than Ohtani’s.

But he lost about $183 million in bets, for a net loss of nearly $41 million. He didn’t bet on baseball.

Mizuhara Ippei is a former interpreter for Los Angeles Dodgers star player Shohei Ohtani.
USA TODAY Sports via Reuters

Mizuhara pleaded guilty to bank fraud and filing false tax returns.

The bank fraud charge is punishable by up to 30 years in federal prison, and the false tax return charge is punishable by up to three years in federal prison.

The sentencing hearing is scheduled for October 25th.

Mizuhara pleaded guilty to bank fraud and filing false tax returns. AP
Mizuhara’s plea deal was negotiated with prosecutors before he was indicted in federal court in Los Angeles in mid-May. Reuters

He also must pay restitution to Ohtani totaling about $17 million, as well as more than $1 million to the Internal Revenue Service.

However, the amount may change before judgment is reached.

Mizuhara’s plea deal was negotiated with prosecutors before he was indicted in federal court in Los Angeles in mid-May.

He was initially charged with bank fraud.

Authorities said there was no evidence that Ohtani was involved in or knew about Mizuhara’s gambling, and that he was cooperating with the investigation.

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Reddit
Telegram
WhatsApp