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Lightning strikes Empire State Building and One World Trade Center in dramatic pics

The Big Apple is vibrant!

A severe thunderstorm ripped through Manhattan on Wednesday night, striking two of the city’s iconic skyscrapers.

Dramatic photos were taken capturing the split second when lightning struck both the Empire State Building and One World Trade Center.

On May 29, 2024, a thunderstorm occurred in New York City, causing lightning to strike the spire of One World Trade Center. John Angelillo/UPI/Shutterstock

The astonishing images show brilliant white lightning bolts cutting through the night sky and zigzagging their way to the tips of the antennas atop each building.

Empire State Building’s X-Page I shared one photo The video shows the building being hit by an electric shock and glowing red, accompanied by the simple caption “Ouch.”

According to the website, the Empire State Building’s antenna is struck by lightning an average of 25 times a year.

Lightning reportedly struck One World Trade Center last Thursday morning. To Fox Weather.

During the same storm, lightning struck a building in Manhattan, injuring one person, the media reported.

Lightning strikes the Empire State Building in New York City during a thunderstorm, as seen from Hoboken, New Jersey, on May 29, 2024. Getty Images
This is the second time this month that lightning has struck One World Trade Center. John Angelillo/UPI/Shutterstock

Antennas and lightning rods on buildings are designed to absorb the shock of a lightning strike to protect the building itself and people inside from electric shock.

Contrary to popular belief, lightning rods do not attract lightning strikes.

Lightning rods only protect buildings, but lightning often strikes the tallest things around, like these skyscrapers.

Wednesday night’s heavy rain and thunderstorms came after a day of sunny skies and warm temperatures.

About a half-inch of rain is expected in the city, according to the National Weather Service.

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