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Short questions with Dana Perino for Dr. Nicole Saphier

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You’ve seen us on screen, but have you ever thought about what we look like off camera?

Over the past few months, I’ve been having fun checking in with your favorite Fox personalities to find out who they are behind the scenes.

What Jesse Watters can’t live without? What is Bill Hemmer’s favorite Halloween costume? And what’s on Greg Gutfeld’s nightstand? Or?

But that’s not all! The fun is just beginning.

This week, we’re excited to spotlight Dr. Nicole Safier. She has been a contributor for Fox News Channel (FNC) since her 2018 and explains the latest medical news on all platforms.

Additionally, she is the author of Fox News Books’ newest title, Love, Mom, which shines a light on maternal love with powerful first-person stories from the Fox News family and others.

Dr. LOVE, MOM, where moms share their life stories, plus tips and inspiration.Nicole Safia

Dr. Saphier is a board-certified radiologist with advanced fellowship training in breast imaging. In addition to his clinical, research, and media responsibilities, he holds leadership and advisory positions with the New Jersey Department of Health Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Radiological Society of New Jersey.

PS We have many other options available. Stay tuned every week for a new edition of “Dana Perino’s Short Questions.” If you have any questions you’d like answered or suggestions for who we should interview next, please leave a note in the comments section below.

Dr. Nicole Safia tells Dana Perino, “It’s very difficult to be able to admit and forgive when you’re wrong or have made a mistake, but it allows you to move forward and do what’s best for your patients.” It is the only way to stay healthy while providing care for our own health. ” (Fox News)

Q: When you were little, what did you want to be when you grew up? Have you always wanted to be a doctor or what drew you to the medical field?

NS: Ever since I could remember, I wanted to become a doctor. I don’t really know what that meant in the child’s mind.

It wasn’t until I was already in medical school and my grandmother passed away from advanced breast cancer that my passion became a professional career in early cancer detection and patient advocacy for accessible testing. I realized that it is about dedicating.

Q: What do you think about the role of technology in healthcare today? What innovation excites you the most?

NS: There’s a joke around the hospital that I’m the least tech savvy person around, but that’s because I’m a stickler and don’t like change.

Technology excites and terrifies me at the same time. In my daily life, I rely heavily on modern technology to detect cancer using X-rays, ultrasound, nuclear imaging, and MRI.

We are most excited about the ability to combine imaging and blood tests to maximize detection power while reducing false-positive rates.

Q: What characteristics do you think are essential for effective leadership in the medical field?

NS: As doctors, we aim for perfection. Our patients’ lives depend on it.

But we are also human and imperfect.

“As physicians, we strive for perfection. Our patients’ lives depend on it.”

It is very difficult to be able to admit and forgive yourself when you are wrong or have made a mistake, but it allows you to move forward and provide the best care to your patients while maintaining your own health. It’s the only way.

Q: You have a medical background, but you’re also active in front of the camera. How do you balance these two worlds, and which skills you learned in your medical training do you feel are most useful for your TV work?

NS: I’ve been with Fox News Channel for over eight years, but I’m still new to the camera. For me, the daily job of diagnosing cancer opens my eyes to other aspects of life.

My emotions are in check, and I carry over my habits from academia to ensure that what I say is backed by data and not influenced by outside forces.

I always want to express myself as I am.

question: After experiencing coronavirus pandemichow do you think our society is currently prepared for future global crises? What important lessons have we learned?

NS: As a society, we are now putting in place screening and warning mechanisms that can be reused. The national stockpile of medical supplies was also replenished.

Newer and more efficient ways to bring medicines to market have also been developed.

“We are now putting in place screening and warning mechanisms that can be reused.”

Unfortunately, the level of public mistrust in the medical establishment resulting from the mishandling of the pandemic far outweighs the improvements learned.

Q: Taking a short break from medicine, what is the most memorable concert or musical performance you have ever attended?

NS: Il Volo, I love this trio. And when they came to Scottsdale 15 years ago, they brought me on stage and I danced with one of them while the others sang.

Q: What do you wish you had known when you were younger?

NS: If I could write a letter to my younger self, I would go back to being a terrified 17-year-old, crying into my pillow with my pregnant belly sticking out.

I would tell her to stop letting external noise control her inner feelings.

I was a pregnant teenager and my mother made this important decision.

All that matters is her family and the little boy growing inside her. She may not feel strong right now, but she is stronger than she knows and she is building a beautiful life for herself and her future family. .

Q: If you could hop on a plane right now and go anywhere in the world, where would you go? Why?

NS: Italy! The Amalfi Coast has a special place in my heart.

I took my oldest son there when he was about 9 years old and we had a great time playing on the beach and soaking up the culture. Now that my younger sons are that age, we will be returning to make more memories.

Q: What do you like most about working at FOX News?

NS: I could not be more grateful for the writing and speaking opportunities that come with my association with Fox.

As a doctor, I always want to help people, but the number of patients a hospital can see in a day is limited.

When I became involved in patient advocacy, I realized that I could help even more people by helping pass legislation. Now, with a national platform, we can reach more people than ever before.

Q: Fact and Fiction: Confirm or debunk the following medical myths!

Fact or fiction? I’m relatively healthy, so I don’t need a primary care physician (PCP).

NS: error! PCP is great for monitoring everything mentally and physically and reminding you of cancer screening tests.

Fact or fiction? When apples turn red, doctors turn blue.

NS: It’s true (in a sense). I eat an apple every morning in the morning for its health benefits.

Faction or fiction: Does gum really take 7 years to digest?

NS: Maybe it’s true, but it doesn’t really get digested. It comes directly from all over the body within a few days.

Fact or fiction? Eating carrots improves your eyesight.

NS: truth. Carrots are rich in beta-carotene, which is essential for the body’s production of vitamin A and the eye’s ability to see in the dark.

Fact or fiction? If you go out on a cold day, you may catch a cold.

NS: error. You don’t catch a cold just because it’s cold. Rather, it is caused by a common virus. Viral infections occur more frequently during the cold season as people gather indoors and the virus spreads.

“Although limited, there is some data to suggest that pre- and post-workout pickle juice can help avoid muscle cramps.”

Fact or fiction?Consuming pickle juice can relieve muscle spasms within minutes.

NS: truth. Although limited, there is some data suggesting that pre- and post-workout pickle juice can help and avoid muscle cramps.

Fact or fiction?skin is the largest organ in the body.

NS: Sure, take care of it.

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To read all of Dana Perino’s previous “Short Questions” interviews on Fox News Digital, check out this (long) list.

For her interview, Kelly Kupek Urban, click here.

For her interview, Dr. Mark Siegel, click here.

For her interview, Taylor Riggs, click here.

For her interview, Griff Jenkins, click here.

For her interview, Joe Concha, click here.

For her interview, David L. Bahnsen, click here.

For her interview, Dagen McDowell, click here.

For her interview, Lidya Hu, click here.

For her interview, Brian Bremberg, click here.

For her interview, Jackie DeAngelis, click here.

For her interview, Claudia Cowan, click here.

For her interview, Max Gauden, click here.

For her interview, Jared Cohen, click here.

For her interview, William La Jeunesse, click here.

For her interview, Matt Finn, click here.

For her interview, Rich Edson, click here.

For her interview, Governor Chris Sununu, click here.

For her interview, Ross Raeburn, click here.

For her interview, Mark Meredith, click here.

For her interview, Emily Compagno, click here.

For her interview, Chad Pergram, click here.

For her interview, Mike Emanuel, click here.

For her interview, Gillian Turner, click here.

For her interview, Madison Alworth, click here.

For her interview, Nate Foy, click here.

For her interview, Laura Ingraham, click here.

For her interview, Five New York FOX reporters, click here.

For her interview, Katie Pavlich, click here.

For her interview, Guy Benson, click here.

For her interview, Pete Hegseth, click here.

For her interview, Sandra Smith, click here.

For her interview, Nicholas Janicelli, click here.

For her interview, Abby Hornacek, click here.

For her interview, Elise Bitter, click here.

For her interview, Brian Kilmeade, click here.

For her interview, Kennedy, click here.

For her interview, John Roberts, click here.

For her interview, Janice Dean, click here.

For her interview, Charles Payne, click here.

For her interview, Trey Gordy, click here.

For her interview, Johnny “Joey” Jones, click here.

For her interview, Bill Melzin, click here.

For her interview, Jimmy Failla, click here.

For her interview, Tyrus, click here.

For her interview, Ainsley Earhart, click here.

For her interview, Lawrence Jones, click here.

For her interview, Dr. Arash Akhavan, click here.

For her interview, Martha McCallum, click here.

For her interview, Bret Beyer, click here.

For her interview, Kayley McEnany, click here.

For her interview, Harold Ford Jr., click here.

For her interview, Shannon Bream, click here.

For her interview, Jessica Tarloff, click here.

For her interview, Leo Terrell, click here.

For her interview, Geraldo Rivera, click here.

For her interview, Clay Travis, click here.

For her interview, Bill Hemmer, click here.

For her interview, Greg Gutfeld, click here.

For her interview, Benjamin Hall, click here.

For her interview, Judge Jeanine Pirro, click here.

For her interview, Jesse Watters, click here.

For more lifestyle articles, visit www.foxnews.com/lifestyle.

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