total-news-1024x279-1__1_-removebg-preview.png

LANGUAGE

How to reduce our risk and the right questions during screenings

Cancer risk is based on several factors, and while there is no absolute way to prevent all cancers, there are steps you can take to reduce risk and raise awareness so that it can be treated early and most effectively. There are many things you can do. Dr. Marlene Myers from New York University Langone Perlmutter Cancer Center We talked about early warning signs, screening recommendations, and prevention tips we should all be aware of.

What are the often overlooked signs so you can recognize the signs of possible cancer and follow up with your doctor?

Most obvious symptoms won’t turn out to be cancer, but any changes in your health are worth pointing out when you see your doctor. You know your body better than anyone, so we all need to be careful if something doesn’t feel right. Many of us know the common symptoms of cancer – the appearance of a lump, bump, or blood where it shouldn’t be, but there are other things to look out for.


Cancer risk is based on several factors, and while there is no absolute way to prevent all cancers, there are steps you can take to reduce risk and raise awareness so that it can be treated early and most effectively. There are many things you can do.

Unexplained fatigue, weight loss, loss of appetite, and even depression can be warning signs, so tell your doctor during your regular checkup. Changes in the shape, size, or color of your stool can also indicate that something is wrong. Even if these changes are not the result of cancer, they may be caused by something else that needs to be addressed. It’s never a bad idea to talk to your doctor about any concerns you have.

cancer survivor You should be on the lookout for persistent symptoms that may indicate a recurrence. At the same time, everyone has to live their life and realize that some aches and pains are normal. We all experience headaches. Muscle fatigue occurs when you start a new training program. If the pain subsides within a few days or with over-the-counter medications and doesn’t come back, there’s probably no need to worry.

When and what tests should I get, even if I don’t have a family history of cancer?

Screening is important to detect cancer early, which has been shown to make treatment easier and provide better outcomes in most cases. Screening is just as important as prevention, so here are some general steps to take to see your doctor, depending on your age.


Marlene I. Myers, MD, is a medical oncologist and director of the Cancer Survivorship Program at New York University Langone Perlmutter Cancer Center.
Marlene I. Myers, MD, is a medical oncologist and director of the Cancer Survivorship Program at New York University Langone Perlmutter Cancer Center.

mammogram is an important screening tool for breast cancer. We recommend that every woman get a mammogram every year once she turns 40. If a woman’s mother or her first-degree relative has had breast cancer, we encourage her to get tested early. genetic testingThis is because there are certain mutations that can increase the risk of breast cancer. For these women, more frequent and more intensive testing may be recommended.

Colonoscopy It is an important screening tool that is both diagnostic and preventive. The recommended age for colonoscopies has recently been lowered from 50 to 45, as more young people are undergoing colonoscopies. colon cancer. The purpose of this screening is not only to find cancer, but also to find and remove polyps that have the potential to become cancerous.

Especially for men, prostate cancer This is also an important screening and includes a physical exam and blood tests if needed, but this also depends on factors such as family history and race. Talk to your doctor about your risks and at what age you should get tested.

Other screenings include a chest scan for smokers and additional tests. Pancreatic cancer screening For people with a family history and annual skin exams for skin cancers such as: melanoma.

One thing we can all do is talk openly with our relatives about our family history of cancer. Another is to talk to your doctor about the risks and work with him to decide when is the best time to get tested. Additionally, there are things you can do to reduce your risk of cancer, such as drinking less alcohol, quitting smoking, and using sunscreen. Although there is always a chance of developing cancer, healthy habits can give people confidence in their health and improve their overall health.


Dr. Marlene I. Myersis a medical oncologist and director of the Cancer Survivorship Program at New York University Langone Perlmutter Cancer Center. Her practice is primarily dedicated to treating breast cancer patients, providing comprehensive care to improve their lifestyle and health before, during, and after treatment.

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Reddit
Telegram
WhatsApp